Anyone towing a car on a open car hauler trailer?

roy826ex

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6.2L engine, 2023 AT4X and I do have Timbren SES system on the rear. Car is a 3500# corvette, trailer curb weight they say is 2000#s. Truck is rated at 8700#s and 870 tongue weight. Tow distance is roughly 950 miles round trip all SE part of country MS, AL, GA then some mountain climbing last 20 miles of the trip. Not asking for mpg I know it will suck the gas at 65-70 mph. Just actual feedback on the total weight and truck handling it. I know that weight is in the neighborhood of some guys big bass boats they tow.
 

I will be following, update us on your experience please. I have a 2022 AT4x, gonna prolly tow my Jeep to hunting camp across MS. Maybe on trailer or on ground.
 

No problem I was worried front from a 20 Cummins to a 1500 and I have a 2024 6.2 1500 AT4 I pull my grand design trailer at 7,800 lbs up a grade in Tahoe that VW beetles can’t do in the summer and I set the cruise at 70 just to see if it would hold and had no issues. Tows really well I also tow a 26 foot enclosed car hauler it’s 3800 empty and my SXS is about 2,300 no issues and I live in the mountains. I actually used my brothers 2024 chev 5.3 to tow all my things before I bought the 1500 to see if I was confident in it. Figured his 5.3 did great so why not get the 6.2. Oh and I get about 8
 

Thanks! With this small dang tank and 8- not much range there😂😂
That is a concern. Had two Tundras with 5.7L and 150 miles was max range pulling a 30' toy hauler at about 8k lbs. This would only be a 1 time trip a year for me so I can deal with the small tank for that plus the route has plenty of gas stations along the way.
 

6.2L engine, 2023 AT4X and I do have Timbren SES system on the rear. Car is a 3500# corvette, trailer curb weight they say is 2000#s. Truck is rated at 8700#s and 870 tongue weight. Tow distance is roughly 950 miles round trip all SE part of country MS, AL, GA then some mountain climbing last 20 miles of the trip. Not asking for mpg I know it will suck the gas at 65-70 mph. Just actual feedback on the total weight and truck handling it. I know that weight is in the neighborhood of some guys big bass boats they tow.

Does the trailer have good working brakes? If not, I would absolutely NOT do it. If so, be careful if you do this tow. Since you mention mountains, be very aware of the downhills where the trailer would be pushing you, downhill bends especially. Get familiar with using that manual trailer brake pressure toggle.

I thought my Tundra towed those weights just fine until I got my 3/4 ton. The stability difference is remarkable, and something you wouldn't understand until you towed that weight with both a 1/2 and a 3/4 ton. I was late and found my GMC 2500 with a dead battery (my fault - I caused that), so I hooked up my Tundra with all my ATV's (~3000lbs) on a 2500lbs trailer and took off down the road. That trip was unnerving enough that I will never tow with that truck again. Strange that I never noticed it before, probably because I thought that what towing was supposed to feel like that.

If you do it, just be careful and forget about those 70mph speeds. You don't want to be like the (at least monthly) trailering 1/2 tons I see flipped over in the median of I91 in VT. There is a long downhill bend with sheer winds that eat those trucks alive. You'll get response after response saying "I owned more than that and I never had a problem", but so said all those I91 drivers too.
 

6.2L engine, 2023 AT4X and I do have Timbren SES system on the rear. Car is a 3500# corvette, trailer curb weight they say is 2000#s. Truck is rated at 8700#s and 870 tongue weight. Tow distance is roughly 950 miles round trip all SE part of country MS, AL, GA then some mountain climbing last 20 miles of the trip. Not asking for mpg I know it will suck the gas at 65-70 mph. Just actual feedback on the total weight and truck handling it. I know that weight is in the neighborhood of some guys big bass boats they tow.
Seriously for this you won’t even know it’s back there. It’s funny all the people who act like these are 1500s from the 80s and 90s. I had a friend who was mind blown after driving my new truck with a trailer. Is it a 2500? No it definitely is not but, My truck weighs about the same as my first Cummins. And has 80 pounds less TQ. People forget that the old 12valves have about the same or less power than these new baby diesels they keep putting out. Just make sure you’re giving yourself space to slow down and an out. That weight is nothing for a 1/2 ton especially since it’s a flat trailer and not a sail like an enclosed trailer.
 

fyi, listen to the people who have extensive experience with towing in general, not just people who have towed things.
I'm not knocking 1500's. I'm just pointing out considerations you have to take. I'm actually a 1/2 ton driver who also has a 3/4 ton to haul the big stuff. I much prefer driving the 1/2 ton in most situations. Much more pleasant.

Points to consider:
  • With ~6000lbs, engine HP and Torque is virtually irrelevant. They all can get it done.
  • It's the momentum and lateral force that will kill you. Vector force actually, if you're into physics. Pay attention to the environment and geography. Take it smart and easy. When you realize you're going too fast, it's often too late.
  • Pay very close attention to the tongue weight when positioning the load.
  • When using a receiver hitch (as opposed to a gooseneck), NEVER correct tail squat with airbags or by beefing up the back end. Tail squat is telling you something: your rear axel is the pivot point and you are taking weight off your front/steering wheels. Airbags will just mask that, but the problem is still there. Airbags have their place, but not with receiver hitch towing.
  • If you have excessive tail squat, and adjusting the load doesn't correct it, get a weight distribution hitch. That actually gets more weight onto your steering tires, when adjusted properly.
  • Get rid of the passenger rated tires, if you have them, and get light truck rated tires. Again, I'm talking safety while towing. "P" rated tires are more pleasant to ride on. Probably better gas mileage too, but get "LT" rated tires if you tow, and carry a lot of weight in the back.
  • Adjust your brake controller, and practice using it before taking the long haul. Don't write-off that manual brake pressure slider on the controller. It's there for a reason, and once you understand it, you'll be using it at times. It's priceless for correcting sway, and even some whip. (Whip is terrifying).
  • Properly torque all your lug nuts before you go, and take your torque wrench with you.
  • Check the trailer wheel hub heat after being on the road for a little while.
 

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Does the trailer have good working brakes? If not, I would absolutely NOT do it. If so, be careful if you do this tow. Since you mention mountains, be very aware of the downhills where the trailer would be pushing you, downhill bends especially. Get familiar with using that manual trailer brake pressure toggle.

I thought my Tundra towed those weights just fine until I got my 3/4 ton. The stability difference is remarkable, and something you wouldn't understand until you towed that weight with both a 1/2 and a 3/4 ton. I was late and found my GMC 2500 with a dead battery (my fault - I caused that), so I hooked up my Tundra with all my ATV's (~3000lbs) on a 2500lbs trailer and took off down the road. That trip was unnerving enough that I will never tow with that truck again. Strange that I never noticed it before, probably because I thought that what towing was supposed to feel like that.

If you do it, just be careful and forget about those 70mph speeds. You don't want to be like the (at least monthly) trailering 1/2 tons I see flipped over in the median of I91 in VT. There is a long downhill bend with sheer winds that eat those trucks alive. You'll get response after response saying "I owned more than that and I never had a problem", but so said all those I91 drivers too.
Yes on brakes brand new trailer and I had a 2016 Duramax Denali HD before diesel went stupid and I traded it in on the 6.2L. Sold my big toy hauler also. I am aware of the differences in the 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton trucks.
 

fyi, listen to the people who have extensive experience with towing in general, not just people who have towed things.
I'm not knocking 1500's. I'm just pointing out considerations you have to take. I'm actually a 1/2 ton driver who also has a 3/4 ton to haul the big stuff. I much prefer driving the 1/2 ton in most situations. Much more pleasant.

Points to consider:
  • With ~6000lbs, engine HP and Torque is virtually irrelevant. They all can get it done.
  • It's the momentum and lateral force that will kill you. Vector force actually, if you're into physics. Pay attention to the environment and geography. Take it smart and easy. When you realize you're going too fast, it's often too late.
  • Pay very close attention to the tongue weight when positioning the load.
  • When using a receiver hitch (as opposed to a gooseneck), NEVER correct tail squat with airbags or by beefing up the back end. Tail squat is telling you something: your rear axel is the pivot point and you are taking weight off your front/steering wheels. Airbags will just mask that, but the problem is still there. Airbags have their place, but not with receiver hitch towing.
  • If you have excessive tail squat, and adjusting the load doesn't correct it, get a weight distribution hitch. That actually gets more weight onto your steering tires, when adjusted properly.
  • Get rid of the passenger rated tires, if you have them, and get light truck rated tires. Again, I'm talking safety while towing. "P" rated tires are more pleasant to ride on. Probably better gas mileage too, but get "LT" rated tires if you tow, and carry a lot of weight in the back.
  • Adjust your brake controller, and practice using it before taking the long haul. Don't write-off that manual brake pressure slider on the controller. It's there for a reason, and once you understand it, you'll be using it at times. It's priceless for correcting sway, and even some whip. (Whip is terrifying).
  • Properly torque all your lug nuts before you go, and take your torque wrench with you.
  • Check the trailer wheel hub heat after being on the road for a little while.
I have towed big items and lots of weight before just never a vehicle in tow.
 

Gatlinburg Car Show?
Not exactly I have 3 friends who live in the Suches GA area and all have nice vettes and a Porsche in the mix. We all usually ride the mountain roads on motorcycles at a brisk pace but lately they have been in their cars more so I bought me a new Vette 2 months ago. Planning a spring trip up there but I'm 400+ miles one way away and decided I would trailer my car. Towing a car will be all new to me from actually towing it to strapping it down. I know how to haul motorcycles lol said car I bought
 

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Sounds like fun, same here, when I had my Harley I rode everywhere. I got stupid and let someone talk me outta my hot rod bout 6 months ago. Great place to ride up there, we go every year. Congrats on the new Vette!!
 

Sounds like fun, same here, when I had my Harley I rode everywhere. I got stupid and let someone talk me outta my hot rod bout 6 months ago. Great place to ride up there, we go every year. Congrats on the new Vette!!
I should move up there but I can't stand the winters up there.
 

I have towed big items and lots of weight before just never a vehicle in tow.

That's why I'm wasting my time commenting, and getting pissed on for it. Vehicle towing is the worst. Anything on springs and shocks actually. No matter how hard it's tied down to the trailer frame, it can get squirrelly.
 

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